Kindergarteners and First Graders Study Pumpkin Life Cycle in Chesnut’s Pie Garden

We call them “volunteer plants” — seedlings that push up out of the garden unexpectedly, sometimes from a predecessor who left its seeds behind after decomposing in the compost pile.

Last August when the students returned to school, in addition to pumpkins they had planted, they were surprised to find other varieties that had cropped up out of a rotting pumpkin left to decay in our compost pile, whose soil had then been added to the Pie Garden.IMG_2774First grade teacher Ms. Radford seized on this opportunity to demonstrate the plant life cycle — a science standard — to the students, who observed the pumpkins (fruits) ripening on the plant vines. They chose one pumpkin to study its decay in Ms. Radford’s classroom all year, after which the students harvested those seeds for replanting in the Pie Garden.

Meanwhile, parent Garden Leader Carissa Malone put those squash to good use – by turning them into homemade pumpkin pie! The kindergarteners who had planted the pumpkins were treated not only to Ms. Malone’s delicious cooking, but also to a presentation she put together to demonstrate how their school-grown produce became a delectable treat. This reinforces a basic Farm to School objective, which is to debunk a misconception our children can sometimes have:  that food comes from grocery store shelves. In this case, it came from their school!

pumpkin scooped